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A Girls' Education

Why a Girls' School?

In a learning environment dedicated to girls and without competition and social pressure from boys, girls are free to pursue academic
excellence in any area they choose. Single-sex educated girls receive a less gender-stereotyped development then co-educated girls and engage in more healthy competition and risk-taking - skills that are advantageous for leadership and life success.

What The Research Shows

There are many advantages to girls being educated in girls' schools where there are no expectations to fulfil traditional gender stereotypes in the subjects that they study, the activities they participate in or the careers they pursue. Girls' schools create a culture of strong academic achievement.

Evidence is gathering that women in single-gender classes benefit, and they benefit significantly  (Booth, 2014)

Girls in single sex schools perform better academically than their counterparts in co-educational schools, after holding constant measures of selection, background, peers and school factors (Cabezas, 2010) 

Girls in single-sex schools classes participate more actively in classroom discussions and are more engaged in their learning (Holmgren,2014)

The culture of an all girls school provides a unique socialisation process, which allows a young woman the freedom to reach beyond stereotypical career expectations (Tully and Jacobs, 2010)

Single gender classes provide a learning environment where the female voice is not marginalised. The personal attributes of the teachers, most notably their encouragement, care and availability, motivate these female students from single gender schools to excel. (Tully and Jacobs, 2010)

Girls and girls' schools have "higher aspirations", "greater motivation" and are "challenged to achieve more than their female peers" at co-ed independent and public schools (Holmgren, 2014)

Women who attended single-sex schools "earn a 19.7% higher wage than women who attended co-educational high schools". There was a "substantial" economic return for women who attended single-sex schools (Billger, 2007)




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